How to Make a 24″ GoPro Pole Mount

- January 1, 2012

There are many ways to make a do-it-yourself GoPro “ski-pole” mount these days, this is simply my version I made at home using the GoPro Hero 2 and no additional mounts. This is not the “best” solution, as I had some pretty unique pieces you may not be able to come across. However, I am hoping this will help you all see how easy and cheap it can be do this yourself with things you may have lying around your house.

My GoPro 24" Pole Mount

The pole I used was from an aluminum towel rack that we had removed from our bathroom. Yes, kind of unique, but it worked for me and hopefully it will give you some ideas of your own!


Items I used to Construct My GoPro Pole Mount

GoPro Pivot Arms
One of the supplied GoPro pivot arms, I used the larger one.

24" Aluminum Towel Rod, square & hollow.
24″ Aluminum Towel Rod, square & hollow.

Hardware
A Power Drill (not shown)
11/64″ Drill Bit
#10 1″ Machine Screws & Nuts
2 Washers that fit the Screws


Construction

I took the pics below after construction was complete. Assuming you are somewhat “handy” you should be able to see what is done in the pic itself, but just in case you can’t here is a breakdown. You’re basically going to drill a hole through the rod and insert one screw through both the rod and the pivot arm. Aligning the holes on the pivot arm to the holes you’re going to drill is very important. I was even slightly off and had to insert small spacers to remove any wiggle room (see below).

  1. Assuming you have the holes you’re going to drill marked and aligned properly, Use your 11/64″ drill bit and drill a hole through the rod on two parallel sides.
  2. Slide bottom of GoPro pivot arm into the hollow rod so the holes you drilled and the holes on the pivot arm match up. The rod I used happen to fit the pivot arm almost flush.
  3. Insert a screw through the rod & pivot arm, I recommend using washers on both sides to avoid damaging the aluminum from over-tightening.
  4. Tighten screw down using a nut on the opposite side.

GoPro Pole Mount Construction

The green stuff you see on my pic is actually just small pieces of a plastic zip-tie I cut and inserted into the gaps. This helped remove any “wiggle” from the attached mount.

Finished GoPro Pole Mount

Using plumbers silicon Rescue Tape, I secured all seams (and my inserted zip-tie spacers) by wrapping the tape around the mount a few times. I love Rescue Tape because it’s made from silicon, stretchy, and self-adhering. However, you could use Gorilla tape, Duct tape, or whatever works best for you.

Handle

For the handle I stole a foam grip from an old dust broom I had lying around and just zip-tied it on. Worked fine however you could also simply wrap electrical tape, hockey tape, or whatever else you find works best for you.

Completed GoPro Pole Mount

That’s It!


Sample Video

Cannon Mtn GoPro Powder Day Jan20th 2012 from WhoaSnow on Vimeo.

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Posted by Dan, under Tips, Tricks & Helpful Info.
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Comment (RSS)
  • Using the GoPro Tripod Mount with a $10-Tripod allows you to tilt the camera at any angle, extend the camera at different lengths and enjoy the ride with very little effort.
    http://youtu.be/v_B17ej-dwU

  • thanks, this is exactly what i was looking for and cheap to

  • Great info right here. I was looking for an alternative to buying a commercial pole mount this should work fine.

  • Wayne

    Quik Pod is a monopod made to be used with Go Pro and lets the user take his or her own photo. Check it out on http://www.facebook.com/quikpod

    • Dan

      Hey Wayne, yeah it is pretty nice and admittedly much better than what I made. However it also costs $35 + shipping AND you need the GoPro universal tripod mount which is another $10. The pole mount I built costs around a total of $2.00 and that was only because I had to buy the right sized machine screws. 🙂

  • Matt

    If you bend the pole just a few degrees, or add a 5″ elbow on the end, you can footage without the pole taking up part of the frame.

    • Dan

      Hey Matt thanks for the tip! I’ll have to look into some modifications soon. Still new to the camera itself and having a blast with it.